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SIG P210 FOR SALE

SIG P210 FOR SALE.

The new SIG is made in America. This is interesting, as the original SIG was made in Switzerland by Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft, while the majority of handguns marked SIG were manufactured by agreement with JP Sauer of Germany.

The double-action system and frame-mounted decocker of the P220 were pioneered by the JP Sauer 38H, so JP Sauer had more than a little input into the design of the SIG Sauer P-series.

When SIG built their plant in New Hampshire, this marked the P-series manufacture in yet another nation. It might be said, the new pistol is Americanized.

I don’t think any of us complained when SIG changed the P220’s magazine release from a heel to a push button and produced the American version, but I am certain some will complain concerning the P210A’s detail changes.

The P210 replaced the Luger and a short-lived SIG design as a Swiss service pistol and served from 1948 to 1975, when it was replaced by the SIG P220 9mm.

The Swiss placed a premium on accuracy, and the P210 delivered. The pistol was designed by noted designer Charles Petter.  Petter was responsible for the French 1935 as well.

SIG P210 FOR SALE

While often criticized as an odd and underpowered pistol, my experience with the 1935 is that it’s a miniature P210 in most regards. The pistol is very accurate.

I once undertook a loading project with the 7.65 French Long the 1935 chambers. The result was a super-accurate pistol that fired a cartridge more powerful than most .32 H&R Magnum loads.

But that is another story. The P210 chambered the much more powerful 9mm Luger cartridge — which the Swiss had large stores of.

The pistol was immensely popular in a nation of shooters and was widely used in target competition.

There are very few handguns I hold in the greatest esteem, a head and shoulders above the others. A well-made 1911, the Hi-Power and the CZ 75 are among these.

I certainly have respect for the SIG Sauer P-series service handguns. For some time I have wished to own a SIG P210 9mm pistol, but finances and opportunity have not met.

Most modern introductions are polymer frame, striker-fired handguns. There are plenty of inexpensive 1911s and when someone introduces a top-quality pistol, it seems to be on the 1911 pattern.

The new SIG P210A is an exception. This is a steel frame, single-action 9mm with a single-column magazine. It isn’t similar to most handguns and it defines excellence and accuracy.

The new pistol differs mechanically from the original P210. SIG Sauer pioneered a system in which the barrel hood butts into the ejection port for lockup.

The P-series are famed for accuracy. The P210A uses this system rather than the P210’s locking lugs.

SIG P210 FOR SALE

The pivoting trigger is basically the same, while the pistol features an elongated grip tang for greater comfort. A great improvement is the new frame-mounted safety.

The original P210 features a safety behind the trigger and just in front of the grips. This isn’t a fast or tactical system. The new safety is better suited to personal defense use.

Unlike the Swiss and German P210 pistols, the new P210A, while not inexpensive, will be affordable for many of us. CNC machinery makes for real precision.

The pistol is stainless steel, a big plus, with the stainless covered in black Nitride finish.

The P210 is a thinner and better-balanced handgun than the images portray. It is lively in the hand. It isn’t a lightweight however, at 37 ounces and 8.4 inches long.

My pistol is a fixed-sight version. This suits my tastes well. The rear sight is adjustable for windage and the front post is dovetailed in place. They feature a white, three-dot setup.

The front strap is nicely checkered and the grips are nicely finished. The checkering adds up to excellent abrasion and adhesion.

The combination of an ambidextrous safety and extended slide lock makes for greater speed in combat shooting, and the new beavertail grip tang makes for more comfortable shooting compared to the older design P210.

The grip design keeps the pistol centered and the sights come to the eye naturally as the pistol is grasped. The new lockup for the ramped barrel makes for excellent accuracy as the firing tests prove.

Since the P210 features reversed frame rails, with the slide riding inside the frame, racking the slide could be more difficult than some pistols.

Properly designed cocking serrations riding on a raised boss in the slide make for excellent leverage. The slide is well-fitted, there is no lateral play at all.

In common with the Petter designed P35 and the Tokarev TT33, the P210 features a modular trigger design. The hammer, mainspring, sear and disconnect are in this unit.

The trigger press is a smooth 3.8 pounds without any trace of creep, grit or backlash. The trigger is among the outstanding features of this handgun.

P210s were coveted by their owners, and in the Swiss tradition, many passed into private hands when the gun’s military service came to a close.

SIG P210 FOR SALE

Swiss production ceased altogether in 2005 though some German-¬made P210 Legend models were produced a decade ago.

If you spot one for less, it is likely to be chambered in .30 Luger, as they are less desirable for obvious reasons.

These are beautifully made guns from a bygone era and are usually wonderfully accurate, but the sticker price is simply too high for most.

Recognizing the demand for this classic, in 2016 SIG Sauer began production of the new P210, a modern handgun that captures many of the design features of the original with a few tweaks added.

SIG Sauer offers the Exeter, New Hampshire–made P210 in two models: The adjustable-¬sighted Target and the more utilitarian Standard. I tested the Standard for this review.

Though this handgun was originally designed for military use and could still serve admirably as a self-¬defense handgun, it really fits better into the target role these days, a niche in which it excels.

The concept of shootability is a subjective one, but there is no doubt that some guns are simply easier to hit with than others.

This usually means a great trigger, good sights and a user-¬friendly grip design — the P210 has all three in spades.

With the possible exception of the Heckler & Koch P7 and the Smith & Wesson Model 52, I cannot recall a factory centerfire handgun that I’ve found to be as shootable as the P210.

The gun naturally points where you want it to, the sights are clear and crisp, and the trigger is light and buttery smooth.

The P210 is a full-¬sized single-¬action handgun with a 5-¬inch barrel. Like the original, the frame and slide on the new P210 are constructed of steel, though the company chose Nitron blackened machined stainless steel over the traditional chromoly.

Thanks to the steel construction, it is a relatively heavy pistol with an unloaded weight of 36.2 ounces, just lighter than a steel-¬framed 1911.

The design is somewhat unique in that the full-¬length frame rails are internal, and the slide rails are external, the exact opposite of most handguns on the market.

The result is a pleasingly slim and trim profile with a low bore axis and a tight lockup. Thanks to a generous beavertail and a high cut behind the triggerguard, the P210 sits low in the hand where it should.

The P210 is a full-¬sized single-¬action handgun with a 5-¬inch barrel. Like the original, the frame and slide on the new P210 are constructed of steel, though the company chose Nitron blackened machined stainless steel over the traditional chromoly.

Thanks to the steel construction, it is a relatively heavy pistol with an unloaded weight of 36.2 ounces, just lighter than a steel-¬framed 1911.

The design is somewhat unique in that the full-¬length frame rails are internal, and the slide rails are external, the exact opposite of most handguns on the market.

The result is a pleasingly slim and trim profile with a low bore axis and a tight lockup. Thanks to a generous beavertail and a high cut behind the triggerguard, the P210 sits low in the hand where it should.

At the top end, the P210’s ejection port has been opened up and the slide-¬mounted extractor has been moved slightly forward.

The ramped barrel is made of carbon steel and is captured by the slide stop which passes through a slot milled into the lug.

The barrel locks into the slide above the front and rear of the chamber in a system more akin to the later P-¬series SIG Sauer handguns than to the original P210 design.

A captive, flat recoil spring rides below the barrel along a full-¬length guiderod.

The P210 maintains the rear slide hump of the original, which adds additional surface area for the milled slide serrations and provides a solid mounting surface for the rear sight dovetail.

The highly visible sights are steel with three white dots and are drift adjustable for windage.